GARF Grunge Lite
Orders (800)600-6163
Support (208)344-6163
E-mail leroy@garf.org
1726 Merrill St. St, Boise, ID, 83705
GEOTHERMAL AQUACULTURE RESEARCH FOUNDATION
We are now selling GARF GRUNGE LITE tm for $5.00 a lb. and it is very full of life.

I am naming some of our products the way I am so that we remember 'THAT THIS IS A HOBBY - HAVE FUN'

GARF GRUNGE LITE tm is now available for you mud filters and you refugiums.

THIRTY YEARS OF MUD FILTER RESEARCH IN BOISE

I have been using mud to grow out brine shrimp since 1967, I found a sure fire recipe in a TFH article. I think Spotte may have written it. It said to use:
1 - cup rock salt
1 - tbsp epson salt
2 - tbsp baking soda
1 - cup nontreated dirt

per gallon of tap water.

In my fossil reef there is a dry sea cave that must have filled with sediment 8 million years ago. I am certain no one has farmed within 15 miles of there in modern times. In 1968 I started using the fossil sea dirt to make filter mud. It has always worked great! I have needed adult brine shrimp several times during the years to do a research project. The mud layer always allows me to crowd the shrimp so much that during the late 60s I sold them wholesale. I had 16 garbage cans full and I harvested them as adults in 10 days. The original recipe said to just put a 100 watt bulb 1/2 way underwater and leave it on 24 hrs a day. This grows algae and keeps the water warm. DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME :)


THIS IS RIGHT SIDE VIEW OF THE FIVE YEAR OLD MUD FILTER BANK
THAT WILL FILTER THE 320 GALLON SPS CORAL BROOD STOCK AQUARIUM

During the past several years I have collected mud for my filter research. Some of the animals in our GRUNGE come from the Mexican mud. I have been buying all of the different types of mud I can get from several rock collectors in Florida for 3 years. I think they thought I was nuts because I bought over nine hundred pounds of the MUD from the bottom of their rock vats.

THIS IS THE END VIEW OF THE FILTERS THAT WE ARE TESTING
THIS UNIT HAS 15 CHAMBERS WITH DIFFERENT
MIXTURES OF MUD AND INVERTEBRATES

My mud is used to grow a great collection of micro inverts. I have grown all types of food animals for 30 years and I have never seen anything like the 24 hr mud filters. The most important thing about any natural filter method is the mix of organisms that make up the substrate. We have over 40 chambers in our lab that we culture the GRUNGE in, and we have been adding to this unbroken chain of organisms since 1976. In the left end of each group of chambers there is a pump chamber that collects the fine silt from the system. I collected all of this small particle silt and the invertebrates that were in it to add to the ocean mud we have been buying and collecting.

THIS PICTURE SHOWS THE PIPES THAT
RETURN THE WATER TO THE 320 GALLON REEF AQUARIUM

This sps coral reef will be filtered by this mud filter for several years so we can collect data on the water quality. GARF is committed to sharing as much information as possible. We hope to help start both ocean and land based reef aquaculture projects so we can remove some of the demand our hobby has for wild collected invertebrates.

THE RIGHT END OF THIS REEF HAS A COLLECTION OF COLORED SPONGES AND GORGONIANS

The return water is full of plankton from the filters and it is feeding the sponges and filter feeding invertebrates in this end of the system.

We are now selling GARF GRUNGE LITE tm for $5.00 a lb. and it will be very full of life. I am naming some of our products the way I am so that we remember 'THAT THIS IS A HOBBY - HAVE FUN' GARF GRUNGE LITE tm is now available for you mud filters and you refugiums.


This picture shows how we have added the mud to the bottom of the chambers. We have the mud deeper on one end so we can find out how deep it should be in large filters. The snails keep all of the micro algae out of the sand and the worms dig down into the bottom of the chambers.

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You can see the Cerith snails under the mud in this picture.
I will be posting pictures of each chamber as they grow and change.

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We are now getting to use many of the Macro algae that
Jerry Adamson has been collecting for several years.

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I am very sure that some of the strains of bright red Macro algae
will be very good filters and they sell very well to people with
reef aquariums. These filters can be used to produce many reef
products that can add to the income of small scale reef farms.

Leroy's Old Home page (The one that Scott did not like)